Children’s Review: Trapped in a Video Game By Dustin Brady

This is definitely one of the coolest books that I’ve read. If you’ve ever played a first-person shooter, you could probably relate to this game. Before I get into the details, how about we start with the blurb.

Trapped in a Video Game Cover-minKids who love video games will love this first installment of the new 5-book series about 12-year old Jesse Rigsby and his wild adventures inside different video games.

Jesse Rigsby hates video games – and for good reason. You see, a video game character is trying to kill him. After getting sucked in the new game Full Blast with his friend Eric, Jesse starts to see the appeal of vaporizing man-size praying mantis while cruising around by jet pack. But pretty soon, a mysterious figure begins following Eric and Jesse, and they discover they can’t leave the game. If they don’t figure out what’s going on fast, they’ll be trapped for good!

Fun, relevant, and action-packed Trapped in a Video Game is the perfect book to get kids off screens and into books! Included in this edition is a bonus More to Explore section that teaches computer programming concepts through a fun game.

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Renee’s Review

The book gets into the video game right away, starting with the Tutorial. Like all tutorials, it’s a bit slow. After the tutorial the action really starts and Jesse gets thrown into a real video game.

The contrast between the main character and his sidekick, Eric, were awesome. You had main character, Jesse, who was a real stick in the mud. He was all work and no play, for the most part. Jesse had to be dragged into doing anything new or exciting. Then you have the sidekick Eric. He was ready for an adventure. I really liked Eric. Life is meant to be experienced, and he definitely wasn’t afraid to hop into the fun and games.

About halfway through the book, it started to remind me of Jumanji. I haven’t seen the old Jumanji, but I’d say this is similar to what Jumanij would be if it were a video game instead of a board game, like the first movie. Only this time, the game is set in cities around the United States instead of in some jungle. It had a nice feel to it and gave kids a little bit of American geography. Not a lot… just enough to identify some main landmarks around the US.

The only thing I didn’t like about this book is it had no real conclusion. I read that this book is meant to be a 5-book series, which might explain why. As for this book, it closed out the main character’s dilemma, sure. The main character also experienced growth. However, the book definitely had an unfinished feel to it. Not exactly a cliffhanger, but rather a “to be continued.”

Overall, I truly enjoyed this book. It was full of laughs. I give it a 5/5. I’m off to read book two, which I hope will wrap up everything a bit more nicer.

Corban’s Review

This is my opinion. I like the book because it has adventure, action, and it’s funny. The characters are very interesting and strange. I think it was cool and interesting. The setting was so nice, and it wasn’t like others books. I don’t know books like this one, like getting sucked up in to a game.

The characters were Mark, Jesse, and Erik. Mark was mysterious and strange like how did he survive 20 years with out food. Jesse was a usual kid. He went over to kids houses and usual things. Erik was fun and mean at the same time, like the time he pushed Jesse off a cliff. They were a team, so getting pushed wasn’t so bad.

The setting was in a game. So, it made sense. Like the giant praying mantis and giant crocodile. I also kinda want to be in it to. I rate this book 3 out of 5. I suggest this book if you like action, adventure, and funny things.

*This book was provided to us through Netgalley.

Children’s Review: The Boy from Tomorrow by Camille DeAngelis

It took me a bit longer to get through this book. I have to admit; I haven’t developed a taste for middle school books yet. I picked up this book because I wanted to see what’s happening in the younger world. I’ve been working a lot with children lately (grade 3-5) and wanted to get an idea of what interests them. Apparently, The Boy from Tomorrow is of some interest to children. I mentioned it in a 4th or 5th grade class I was visiting last week and they seemed all sorts of excited about it. I don’t know how the kids heard about the book, but pretty cool they’re watching for it to come out. Before I get into the review, how about the blurb?

The Boy from Tomorrow CoverJosie and Alec both live at 444 Sparrow Street. They sleep in the same room, but they’ve never laid eyes on each other. They are twelve years old and a hundred years apart.

The children meet through a hand-painted talking board—Josie in 1915, Alec in 2015—and form a friendship across the century that separates them. But a chain of events leave Josie and her little sister Cass trapped in the house and afraid for their safety, and Alec must find out what’s going to happen to them.

Can he help them change their future when it’s already past?

The description seemed interesting enough. After all, I do have a thing for paranormal fiction. It wasn’t exactly the type of paranormal I thought it’d be. It was more like the psychic paranormal versus the shapeshifters, vampires, and occasional witches I’m used to.

I don’t know what’s typical of a middle grade book. However, I found the pacing to be very steady. I’m used to the edge of your seat kind of excitement. This one concentrated a lot on the every day lives of the character. It makes me wonder if this would be classified as literary fiction, another genre I’m less familiar with.

Another thing I found fascinating about this book is the vocabulary. Often times I think vocabulary for children’s books should be simple and easy to understand. However, I found quite a few words in the book that even I had to look up. I wouldn’t save I have out-of-this-world vocabulary knowledge, but I think my vocabulary is pretty decent. I liked it, but also wonder how difficult it’ll be for children. Since I’ve been working with younger children, I often marvel over the words that are unfamiliar to them. In a day of school, I can easily find myself answering the question “What does that word mean?” when simply expressing myself in what I’d think are simple sentences. But then again, I am in Nevada. From what I hear, we have the worst schools in America. 🙂

On with the plot! As I mentioned, the plot was steady. Not slow, not fast… it just progressed. It was interesting enough for me to continue. However, the book didn’t really engross me until about halfway in. What I did like about the storyline is it didn’t shy away from the subject of abuse. The abuse wasn’t raw or even cringe worth (in my opinion). Rather it was presented in a way that I think some children, especially those who might be neglected or experience a bit of cruelty might question is the abuse is deserving or not. I liked that, because there are children out there who aren’t treat right and don’t have an example of what “normal” should be. The other showed a type of abuse that might be on the subtle side for some children. Then she clearly identified it as wrong. She set clear boundaries and an example of what a “normal” parent-child relations might look like.

The author also did away with the nuclear family, both in the 1915 story and the 2015 story. These days it seems such a rarity to find a nuclear family in their first marriage. Not that I wish to see more divorces, widows, or widowers. However, it’s nice to see the less than perfect nuclear family in a book. It makes it relatable to so many children.

Finally, the book finished strong. Camille DeAngelis did an excellent job bring the characters full circle. When the book ended, I felt satisfied. All the pieces were nicely wrapped up and brought to a conclusion. Often times writers leave me with questions… I wonder what happened with… Not this time. I can’t even imagine there being a sequel with how well the author tied the ends together.

Character wise. Alec had a pretty strong personality. I’m not sure how kids typically are at his age (12). However, he definitely knew how he wanted to be treated. He had boundaries. He also had clear expectations on the way others should be treated. That’s not to say he didn’t behave like a child. To show he was a child, he acted out a few times. I don’t recall him having any consequences for his actions though. It didn’t make him seem spoiled, or anything like that. However, it gave me the impression he lacked boundaries for his own behavior. Other than how he should be treated, I wonder if he did have a sense of right or wrong about the way he should behave, like not running away from his father.

I thought Josie, the other main character, was very realistic in her portrayal. She behaved the way I think children behave. Though she was mistreated by her mother, she still followed directions the way children do. With the rules being so different in 1915 than they are today, even the side characters seemed realistic in their behaviors. I could see neglect being overlooked more readily in that time. Truly, I was more on board with the 1915 story line than the 2015 one. Whereas as the adult seemed overly tolerant and accepting of pretty much everything in 2015, the adults in 1915 seemed to work within what was allowable for the time.

Overall, I think the book progressed nicely, but I can’t say it was overly exciting. It wasn’t a bad read for my first middle-school chapter book. I’d give it a 3.5 out of 5.

I received a free copy of this book on Netgalley.

Book Review: Grumpy Cat by Grumpy Cat @RealGrumpyCat

Title: Grumpy Cat: A Grumpy Book
Author: Grumpy Cat
Audience: Grades 3-12 (according to Scholastics)
Length: 96 Pages
Publisher: Grumpy Cat Limited
Copyright Date: 2013
Acquired: Purchased at school book fair
Buy Links: Amazon, Book Depository
Blurb: Internet sensation Grumpy Cat’s epic feline frown has inspired legions of devoted fans. Celebrating the grouch in everyone, the Grumpy Cat book teaches the fine art of grumpiness and includes enough bad attitude to cast a dark cloud over the whole world. Featuring brand new as well as classic photos, and including grump-inspiring activities and games, Grumpy Cat delivers unmatched, hilarious grumpiness that puts any bad mood in perspective.

Corban’s Review

Selection Process: I chose this book because it looked better than all the other ones and looked through the pages it looked better, so I chose Grumpy Cat. The pictures, the artwork, and the word, showed you the history of Grumpy Cat. I also liked that there are games that looked fun and hard.

Thoughts: I thought the book was pleasant. The reason I thought the book was pleasant was it fun to read and play the games. My favorite part of the book was Visualize Grumpiness. You’re suppose to close your eyes and imagine the event happening to you. For example:

A bluebird serenades you from a nearby brook, keeping time to the musical babble of the brook that flows through the forest…
…and it poops on you. When you look up, it poops again. In your eye.

Question for the Author: Why are you grumpy?

Rating: 5 out of 5

Reena’s Review

Selection Process: I never really got into the Grumpy Cat meme. To be honest, I was a bit bummed my son chose such a long book about Grumpy Cat to read. However, I settled into it. The things a mother does for her child…

Thoughts: This particular book has a wide range for reading levels: Grades 3-12. For my 4th grader, this book provided quite a learning opportunities. It included some challenging words: resemblance, biological, optimistic, simultaneously, sullen, demotivational, inspiration, appendectomy, to name a few. Not only were they challenging for him to say, some of the words my son had never heard before, which required an explanation. If you’re looking to help your child expand his/her vocabulary, this may present an opportunity.

The book also had idioms that weren’t not so familiar to my son. For example, ” a dog eats dog world.” Again, it provided opportunities to teach about idioms. Some of the activities were also lost on my son. He expected activities, which you’d find in typical activity books. Since this was more of a book on how to be grumpy and feeling your life with disappointments, some of the activities led to dead ends. That is, some of the activities weren’t true activities or than to expect “lemons.”

This book reminds me of the new disney movies, which are targeted at kids but have adult nuances in them that are above many children’s heads. For those who enjoy reading books with your kids, you might find plenty of jokes and entertainment in this book. In fact, the book reminds me of demotivational posters… but for kids.

If you like snarky and/or Grumpy Cat, this book might just be your thing. I definitely can see why the age range spans so greatly. Grumpy Cat being such a recognized meme, it’ll appeal to younger kids. Though I think the designation in terms of reading levels could have been better defined.

My son and I read this together in about 20 minutes.