Self-publish Like a Business Owner + Giveaway

Self-publish Like a Business Owner + Giveaway

In an earlier post, I mentioned merging my pseudonym with my real name. What that means for you is a heads up for a giveaway I’m hosting through Backbone America. What is this giveaway all about? A few free coaching sessions.

Why hire a coach for self-publishing?

Self-publishing is like any other business, in that it has a product to be sold. As such, you’ll face many of the same challenges as other business owners.

Developing a product

Your books are your product and writing is the development stage. There will be times when you struggle to write your next book, finish your book, refine your book (editing), and even come up with an idea. A business coach can help you work through the early stages of development and moving forward toward publication.

Marketing

If you uploaded your book to a distribution channel and not received the results you expected, lack of or poor marketing is likely the culprit. A business coach can help you strategize, so you’ll have a marketing plan that not only fits your style and personality, but also attracts the right type of readers.

Build confidence

Being a business owner is an uncertain road. It can be full of failures. If you’ve ever received a bad review, been rejected by an agent or publisher, or had your work shredded by a critique, you know exactly what I mean. When those around you have torn you down, a business coach builds you up. Your business coach is your cheerleader, that person who believes in your ability to accomplish greatness. The focus isn’t on what you can’t do. Rather, the focus is on how you can achieve the goals you’ve set out for yourself.

Those are just a few of the reasons. If you’re looking for additional reasons, I encourage you to visit the International Coach Federation, where I’m a member.

Work with Me Immediately

If you’re a go-getter and don’t want to put your dreams on hold for this giveaway, you can start working with me immediately by clicking here.

Don’t worry. If you win the giveaway, that’ll be icing on the cake. Your winning sessions will be added to your current package.

The Sweepstakes

Through the month of March 2017, Backbone America is hosting a sweepstakes. It includes over $1,000 in prizes.

Grand Prize

Three (3) winners will be selected for my REVEAL Next Steps package (Value $399). 

Find Clarity & Set Goals (2 sessions)

If you’re looking for clarity on one particular topic or ready to set a goal, REVEAL Next Steps is ideal. Some clients use this package for author branding, self-discovery, to get unstuck or brainstorm solutions.

WHITE LIST info@backboneamerica

If you win, you’re winner’s notification will come from this email

Terms & Conditions

Terms & ConditionA few key points from the Terms & Conditions:

  • No purchase necessary.
  • Giveaway runs from March 1, 2017 through March 31, 2017.
  • Open to residents of the United States, excluding Rhode Island, where the promotion is void.
  • Must be 18 or over to win.
  • Only one prize per person and per household will be awarded
  • Potential Winner must accept a prize by email within 48 hours of notification

For complete Terms & Conditions, click here.

Please Visit to the Following Supporters!

Unless otherwise stated, all these bloggers review indie authors. Consider them for your next book review. Be sure to check AND follow their review policies. Don’t be a nuisance. 🙂

Mellissa Green, founder of A Blue Green Universe

Oliver and Richard at Striking 13

Catherine at Ethereal Pages

Andrea Jamison at Reviews in the City and IAIindependentPublishingblog.wordpress.com

Barb & Emily at Paging Through The Days Blog

Kai Butcher at K.B. Marketing Group (author/artist promoter)

Valicity Garris at The Rebel Christian

Mirta E. at Turn the Page

Kendra Allen at Reads and Treats

Enter Here

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Visit REVEAL Academy

 

Coach & Consultant

Greetings readers, writers, and authors!

Please overlook the debris, as I reorganize my blog. Recently, I’ve decided to merge my two identities: My status as an amateur writer and business owner.

I would say I’ve done quite well keeping my identities separate until now. Only a select few in my life know that I’m both an erotic author and straight & narrow business professional. Well, that’s changed and I’m not out in the open.

Those of you here know me as a writer, author, blogger, book reviewer. Now meet the vanilla business professional. Alright… not vanilla… maybe not even tame.

My day job, or rather, profession is in the area of business development. My forte is helping entrepreneurs in the early stages of their business. As long as I’m tooting my horn, I’ll say I’m awesome when it comes to putting together financial packages for funding. How awesome? I’m just under $1.15 million in capital infusion, that is helping owners inject money into their businesses.

Let’s see… what did I miss? Names… Renee Townsend. There. I’m out. You have it. Reena Jacobs (the writer) = Renee Townsend (business owner). The name of my business, you ask? Backbone America. Find me at backboneamerica.com.

If you’re looking to run self-publishing like a business, let’s talk. We’ll talk about the direction you want to take your self-publishing business and the challenges you’re facing.

Prequalify for a strategy session.

To Edit or Not to Edit

Last week, Steve Evans responded to my post about fair eBook prices. It got me thinking about the writing and publishing process, and the reason why I expect to be paid for my work. I realize, it wasn’t the writing itself, but rather the stuff that comes after writing which turns the whole thing into work.

I Enjoy Creating

I enjoy the entire creation process. This includes developing plots, creating characters, writing, and even developing book covers. Oh… what fun I have! I have 4 novels which are 75-95% finished with the first draft, a few more that are in the 50% range, and a host of other ideas floating around. However, when I think about going back and polishing those books, my motivation falls flat. In fact, I don’t even want to finish them when I think about having to prepare the for publication. So, I have some choices when it comes to getting my books out there.

Outsource

I can outsource the stuff I don’t like. One of the things business owners should realize is they don’t have to do everything. What they’re unable to do or just plain don’t want to do, they can outsource it to others. For instance, I can pay someone to critique my works, pay for a proofreader, editor, and marketing person. However, the key word is pay. 🙂

One thing everyone realizes is that resources are limited. There’s a cost benefit to pretty much every choice we make. If I pay someone to do all the things I don’t want to do or am unable to do, there are other things I won’t be able to afford to do. And I’ll be honest here. I don’t have a few thousand dollars to blow per book with little chance of recovering the costs.

To Hell with It All!

What Steve really got me thinking about was why I continued to do things I didn’t enjoy. It’s not like I have to prepare my books for publishing. In fact, I can write my first drafts and shove them in a virtual drawer, if I wanted.

On the other hand, I’ve been feeling rather guilty… especially when it comes to the sequels to Shadow Cat. I really feel as if I should finish what I started, and get those other two books out. In fact, book two is pretty much written. While polishing it, I thought about feedback I received from Shadow Cat, and wanted to make sure I didn’t make the same mistakes. So, I went back and rewrote a section. Now the whole thing needs to be reviewed for consistencies. The final book is at that 75% stage… so I’m pretty close with being done with them all… but then I’m in the to hell with it all stage. I just don’t feel like going back and reviewing and polishing them. So why should I continue doing things which make me unhappy? 🙂 There’s enough unhappiness in the world. I don’t need to add an optional unhappiness to my list.

To Hell with My Reputation?

Then again, I can take that attitude and do something different with it. I’ve read quite a few literary agents say they see books on the market which aren’t ready for publishing. I wholeheartedly agree with them. Dare I take my not quite ready drafts and put them on the market? Just the idea feels me with anxiety.

I talked to my husband about the pros and cons of doing that. The reality is I have works I’m sure someone would like to read. However, they’re unlikely to make it into readers’ hands if I’m stuck on preparing them for publication… at least if I continue to work on them to the extend they satisfy me.

However, I can write my first draft, then do a pass or two before sending it off into the world. I can stop obsessing over getting each phrase to sound just right.

What Do You Think, Readers?

Literary agents have their own viewpoints. However, they aren’t my market, readers are. From the reader’s standpoint, would you rather see an early draft of a story or bypass the story all together? I ask because I’m in the to hell with it stage. The works I’m just on the edge of completing will either be filed in the virtual folder or I’ll likely finish them and do some rudimentary passes before sending into the world.

Is it better to get the work out or to slave over the work with the chance it’s just not going to get the attention it needs to be “ready for publication?”

What are your thoughts?

The Fussy Librarian Reader Survey – Short Stories

Looks like The Fussy Librarian is sharing more results today. This time in response to short stories (classified as under 125 pages in this survey). As you know, I hold the belief that writers should be paid for their works, just as people going to their day jobs expect to be paid. Now how much a work is worth is up for debate. This is what I like about the Fussy Librarian surveys. It’s asking the readers, the actual consumers what they think their entertainment is worth.

Short Stories in Numbers

If we do the quick math on that with the standard assumption of 250 words per page, that’s about 31,250 words. The minimum to be considered a novel is 50,000 words or 200 pages. Keep in mind, 200 pages is a short novel. These days, I’m seeing novels running in the 300-375 range (75,000 – 93,750 words). In other words, the short story is looking at about a third of a book, if you’re pushing for the upper 125 page number. With that in mind, according to the Fussy Librarian, 75% of those surveyed read short stories.

The Results!

As a reminder, I mentioned in my last post that The Fussy Librarian revealed the $3.99 price point as the high frequency for eBooks with 55% of those surveyed believing that eBook prices should range from $2.99-4.99.

So what does the survey say about short stories? Well, 30% of those surveyed believed short stories should always be free. This kind of makes me think of the free pens with our logos that we give out to clients. We use the free pens as a way to promote ourselves. Likewise, many authors do the same with their works… the loss leader. However, a loss leader only works if you have a collection of stories to sell. Otherwise, the loss leader is just lost money. 🙂 And really, a loss leader is really a marketing strategy, not an evaluation of how much a work is worth.

So our paying readers… what do they think? The high frequency this time around is $0.99, which came out to be 43% of those surveyed. Not bad, I think, considering 125 pages is about 1/4 to 1/3 of a book. That leaves the remaining consumers (25%) in the $1.99-3.99 price point.

What’s an Author to do?

When I think of 30,000 words, I see it as quite an investment. It’s not like the 5-15K short stories I whip up with Control Freak that might take a week or two max for a first draft and a few more weeks to refine, polish, and edit. A decent 30K word story can easily take a month or more to write (at least for me). Then there’s months and months of rereading, polishing, and editing. We’re not looking at a quick turn around. The longer a work is, the more chance time investment it takes (exponentially).

Yet 30% is a big chuck of consumers who think that effort should be free. If readers believe smaller works have no monetary value, what can an author do? Well, an author can consider packaging their works… putting together a short story collection that equates to the size of a full length novel.

The Unanswered Question

I found it interesting that 30% of consumers thought smaller works (125 pages or less) should be free while 25% of consumers didn’t read short works. Hmmm. What’s the distribution on that? Were those who did not read short stories likely to think short works should be free? Or was it the other way around… those who consumed smaller works valued them less monetarily?

Questions, questions….